Archive for June, 2006

A special report on philanthropy: author interview

Posted: Thursday, June 29th, 2006 @ 1:00 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on A special report on philanthropy: author interview

A discussion with Matthew Bishop, U.S. Business Editor of The Economist: “When the world’s second richest man decides to give away most of his money, a lot of people are going to sit up and take notice. And I think there are a growing number of people out there in the world who are extremely rich… and they’re going to look at [Warren] Buffett and say…why don’t we do that?”

A survey of logistics: author interview

Posted: Thursday, June 15th, 2006 @ 1:00 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on A survey of logistics: author interview

A discussion with Paul Markillie, Business correspondent of The Economist: “Could [companies] have become a little bit too lean and mean in their supply chains? They’re literally using vans and aeroplanes as their mobile warehouses. Could they have taken things too far and could there be risks in the system?”

Technology Quarterly: editor interview

Posted: Thursday, June 8th, 2006 @ 1:00 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Technology Quarterly: editor interview

A discussion with Tom Standage, Technology Editor of The Economist: “As you start to make robots smarter, you also in some ways make them less predictable, because they become more complex systems. Very complex systems tend to go wrong in unpredictable ways… If you’re looking for a cast-iron guarantee that a robot is not going to hurt someone, it’s like asking for the same guarantee with a person, and you just can’t give it.”

A survey of India: author interview

Posted: Thursday, June 1st, 2006 @ 1:00 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on A survey of India: author interview

A discussion with Simon Long, South Asia bureau chief of The Economist: “The extraordinary wealth of English-speaking, technically adept graduate talent…has been the foundation of [India’s] success in the past. But now that resource is beginning to run out, as it were–soon India will face a shortage there–and to find work for the far more significant portion of the Indian population that is not English-speaking, has not been to college, and works at the moment in the fields or is redundant, India needs to turn, in my view, to labour-intensive manufacturing.”