MARKETING STREET FIGHTER

AUTHOR : BILL DECKER

Where did you learn marketing? Did you take a course? Did you get an MBA? Did you hire an MBA? Did you work for a consumer products company? Marketing Street Fighter reviews how the author learned marketing on the mean streets of New York City. Read the stories about growing up on the streets and how it relates to the field of marketing. Meet Billy Bat, “Blades” Marino and others.
See how the tough streets of Hell’s Kitchen prepared this author for a marketing career. Meet the characters he grew up with….tough guys who were all marketing geniuses (but they didn’t know it). It’s an easy fun read with New York City as a backdrop.
It’s a quick easy read that you won’t be able to put down!

MARKET ENTRY TOOLKIT

AUTHOR : BILL DECKER

How do you select a foreign market correctly? Is there a way to “grade” a market and compare one country to another? How do you choose the correct way to enter a foreign market? How do you effectively sell in different countries? What are the roadblocks and pitfalls that await you overseas? How do you avoid “losing your shirt” abroad. The Market Entry Toolkit was developed as a result of decades of negotiations, training workshops and consulting sessions and contains original articles, checklists and unique tools to put logic into the process of selecting overseas markets and partners.

Without A Strategy

AUTHOR : BILL DECKER

Why do companies work without a strategy?
Simple. Executives are afraid that by planning a strategy, there will be more work. Nothing could be further from the truth. A strategy (or set of strategies) will refine and define activities. If activities aren’t on the strategy, they should be avoided. It’s a classic case of an overused phrase: work smarter not harder.The Workbook is organized logically. It starts by helping the user understand the market, the firm itself and the directions being pursued. It asks the user to undergo common methodologies such as defining missions and visions. The user is then required to pull out actionable strategies, measurement techniques and list the parties responsible for fulfillment.

HOW TO 3D PRINT MONEY

AUTHOR : BILL DECKER

Be smarter than you were before the invention of the Internet. 3D Printing is new, hot and controversial. See the trends being created by this new industry and the market opportunities that will flow. Read about international applications and why this technology is so frightening to established firms. See what money making opportunities exist for you and your company.

GLOBAL BUSINESS 1-2-3

AUTHOR : BILL DECKER

Are you interested in Global Business? Don’t have time to read a book? This book is 123 one-liners collected after a 30 year career in international business. There are proverbs, checklists, and a great deal of good solid advice from the People who brought you Lessons from the Road; Start up tips 1-2-3

Start Up Tips 1-2-3

AUTHOR : BILL DECKER

Courses and books dealing with startups tend not to cover the subject matter needed. Textbooks often explain theories, and shy away from the reality that entrepreneurs experience. After more than twenty start-ups in the USA and abroad, these lessons from the road have become a collection; and they are all one-liners; you can get a complete thought in a few seconds…so you have no excuse!

FOREIGN MARKET ENTRY

AUTHOR : BILL DECKER

The business world of today calls for expanding sales and profits in order to achieve ever-increasing earnings. Business owners and managers must look for any available opportunities to keep their market share and expand into new markets. What happens when their local market becomes saturated? The savvy leader is inclined to search abroad for any and all potential new markets for their product or service. New markets offer the possibility of increasing total revenue and/or decreasing the costs of goods sold, thereby increasing profits. Entering new markets may also allow a company to follow its existing customers abroad, attack competitors in their home markets, guarantee a continued supply of raw materials, acquire technology or ingenuity, diversify geographically, or satisfy the stockholders’ desire to expand.

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Get ahead in your business. Here are 50 tips to use technology and other means to get a quick advantage. I wrote this book and sell it for $1.99 because people tell me that “they don’t know where to begin.” Now you’ve spent 2 bucks. You’re more committed than you were 5 minutes ago. You can do one task each day. Most of these items are free.

$1.99

1.Lack of preparation. The three P’s of negotiation are preparation, preparation, and preparation. Do you know about the people with whom you will negotiate? Do you understand anything about their history, culture, or needs? Have you researched the firm you are speaking with, and brought......

The “everybody gets a commission” business model — In other words, no one is getting paid until the deal is fully transacted. We should call it the “ everybody only gets a commission” model....

The term “America” or “American” will always strike emotion overseas. Many other countries seem more neutral, but the United States has its history, its power and its media. Now more than ever, the United States is a controversial business ally. In addition to fighting two......

The latest 3D Printing Podcast features Brad Feld at Foundry Group speaking about his thoughts in 3D Printing. The latest 3D Printing Videos can be found at the 3D Printing Channel, the top source for 3D Printing News and Videos. The latest on 3D Printing......

Could 3d Printing be better overseas? Part 1 As the whole world is talking about 3-D printing, at the 3D Chamber of Commerce, I’m starting to believe that the United States will not dominate this reinvented industry. There are two reasons for this. The first......

3D printing is achieved using an additive process, where successive layers of material are laid down in different shapes.[2] 3D printing is also considered distinct from traditional machining techniques, which mostly rely on the removal of material by methods such as cutting or drilling (subtractive......

There will be less “big manufactured” goods. Specialty manufacturing will take some of that industry away. There will be less manufacturing jobs. If audiologists can print on site and on demand, what happens to the people in the hearing aid factory? Less shipping. Instead of......

We’re all aware of stories about how firms get cheated in overseas dealings. Businesses complain of it, and there seems to be little way to enforce a company’s rights in overseas markets. Sometimes it’s foreign companies that cheat us, sometimes foreign governments. While we may......

A discussion with Matthew Bishop, U.S. Business Editor of The Economist: "When the world's second richest man decides to give away most of his money, a lot of people are going to sit up and take notice. And I think there are a growing number of people out there in the world who are extremely rich... and they're going to look at [Warren] Buffett and say...why don't we do that?"...

A discussion with Emma Duncan, Deputy Editor of The Economist: "We need to think about climate change maybe as individuals think about insuring their houses: you spend maybe 1% of your annual income insuring your house not because you think it's going to burn down, but because if by any chance it did burn down, the consequences for you would be disastrous."...

A discussion with Edward Carr, Business Affairs Editor of The Economist: "Median pay for executives is around $7m per year. That's a lot of money, but not that much when you compare it with people in similar professions--lawyers, traders, hedge fund managers. They've actually outpaced executives. If you look at executive pay in the context of other high-flyers, it is not that egregious....

A discussion with Sophie Pedder, Paris Bureau Chief of The Economist: "There is nothing inevitable about decline in France. There is a sense sometimes elsewhere that this is just the way the French are... that they are conservative and resistant to change. That is actually nonsense."...

A discussion with Simon Long, South Asia bureau chief of The Economist: "The extraordinary wealth of English-speaking, technically adept graduate talent...has been the foundation of [India's] success in the past. But now that resource is beginning to run out, as it were--soon India will face a shortage there--and to find work for the far more significant portion of the Indian population that is not English-speaking, has not been to college, and works at the moment in the fields or is redundant, India needs to turn, in my view, to labour-intensive manufacturing."...

A discussion with Robert Cottrell, Head of Global Agenda for Economist.com: "The business environment has been changing so radically in banking: with deregulation, new information technology and the growth of the capital markets. For those reasons, if the management of a bank argues that a merger is going to be beneficial for shareholders...It's very hard for an outsider to argue very conclusively against that point of view."...

A discussion with Paul Markillie, Business correspondent of The Economist: "Could [companies] have become a little bit too lean and mean in their supply chains? They're literally using vans and aeroplanes as their mobile warehouses. Could they have taken things too far and could there be risks in the system?"...

A discussion with Michael Reid, Americas Editor of The Economist: "There is no longer a hegemonic single party in Mexico. It now has three main political parties, none of which has a majority. New institutions and rules have not been set up to encourage collaboration, particularly between Congress and the executive, so the process of reform has stopped on the one hand, and on the other hand, because there's only been partial reform, there is a lot of frustration for many Mexicans about the lack of benefits from that."...